JetBlue

Singapore Airlines joins farm-to-flight trend

d

Where is the food and produce you eat on a plane grown?

Starting in September, the answer for passengers on Singapore Airlines’ passengers leaving Newark for Singapore will be “indoors, nearby.”

Singapore Airlines is working with indoor vertical farming company AeroFarms, which has reclaimed an abandoned steel mill in an industrial area near Newark International Airport and transformed it into a 1-acre, indoor vertical farm.

The farm, which grows produce ‘aeroponically’ without soil, pesticides or sunlight, can produce the equivalent of 390 acres of locally grown produce with up to 30 harvests each year and will grow a customized blend of fresh produce for SIA’s Newark-to-Singapore flights starting in September 2019.

“Imagine boarding a plane and enjoying a salad harvested only a few hours before takeoff — literally the world’s freshest airline food,” said Antony McNeil, director of food and beverage for Singapore Airlines.  “The only way to get fresher greens inflight is to pick them from your own garden.”

Singapore Airlines shared examples of farm-to-flight dished business class and premium economy class passengers might be able to choose from on Newark to Singapore flights:  

Soy Poached Chicken:Pickled Ginger Vinaigrette, Zucchini Ribbons, with Sweet Potato Roesti, Soy Beans and AeroFarms Baby Pac Choi

The Garden Green: Poached Asparagus, Broccolini, Avocado with Shaved Fennel & Flaked Hot Smoked Salmon, with AeroFarms medley of Baby Ruby Streaks, Watercress and Arugula, with Lemon Vinaigrette

As I reported last year in a farm-to-flight feature for USA TODAY, Singapore Airlines’ joins several other airlines in being super creative and eco about the food served on its flights.

Korean Air has its own company farm.

Jedong Ranch sits on 3,700 acres of South Korea’s lush Jeju Island and has been operating since 1972, when it was purchased by the former chairman of the airline’s parent company, the Hanjin Group.

Back then, South Korea had a beef shortage, so breeding livestock was the first order of business. Early on, the herd was made up exclusively of imported Angus cattle. Today the ranch is home to more than 2,200 head of prized, grass-fed Korean native cattle known as Hanwoo.

The organic, antibiotic-free meat from these animals, and from the farm’s flock of approximately 6000 free-range chickens, is sent to Korean Air’s flight catering kitchens in Seoul for use in meals served to first and business-class passengers. Some of the meat and eggs from the farm are also available, at premium prices, for purchase locally.

In addition to raising cows and chickens, the ranch’s hydroponic greenhouse also produces more than 210 tons of fruit and vegetables, including red peppers, cherry tomatoes and blueberries for   first and business class in-flight meals.

JetBlue’s garden at JFK

In 2015 JetBlue created a 24,000 square-foot milk-crate garden outside Terminal 5 at New York’s John F Kennedy International Airport. Designed to both create a welcoming green space and promote local agriculture, the garden generates more than 2,000 pounds of blue potatoes, kale, carrots, leeks, arugula, garlic, mint, basic and other herbs for local food banks. 

Japan Air Lines agritourism attraction

In 2010, Japan Air Lines is scheduled to open an agritourism attraction on land near Tokyo’s Narita International Airport. The ‘JAL Agriport’ will offer visitors a chance to pick strawberries, harvest sweet potatoes, picnic, or purchase fresh produce grown in the region. JAL says it also plans to use some agriport produce in lounge menus and in-flight meals.

And Emirates announced last year that it was joining with Crop One to build the world’s largest vertical farming facility near the airport in Dubai to help create a supply chain of “high quality and locally-sourced fresh vegetables, while significantly reducing our environmental footprint,”the airline said in a statement.  

A tasty trend for sure.

JetBlue giving away ‘Hamilton’ tickets in Puerto Rico

Have you seen Lin Manuel Miranda’s hit play Hamilton yet?

Me either.

But here’s a cool contest that not only includes tickets to the play – with Lin-Manuel Miranda back in the role of Hamilton – plus plane tickets from New York to Puerto Rico, where the play is being performed.

JetBlue’s Duel Seats: JetBlue’s Hamilton in Puerto Rico Ticket Giveaway starts January 10 at 9:00 AM and runs through January 16.

it’s a new contest each day.

Winners get two roundtrip flights from New York City’s JFK International Airport to San Juan, Puerto Rico; two premium tickets to Hamilton; and a one-night hotel stay in San Juan.

This is a ‘last-minute’ type of contest. So read the rules carefully.

A winner will be chosen each day at 9 a.m. If you win you’ll have just an hour to respond to a phone call and email prize notification. And you’ll need to be ready to take the trip to San Juan the next day.

If you don’t live in New York, you’ll need to get yourself there in time to fly out of JFK on a 5:40 a.m. flight on the day of the performance. And if you do live in or near New York, you still have to get yourself to and from the airport in time for that early flight.

Good luck!

JetBlue’s new contest will fly you home, wrapped.

Thinking about what to get your family for as a gift this holiday? JetBlue has an idea.

 

Five winners in JetBlue’s Go Get Gifted contest will get flown home on Christmas Eve (12/24) and then gift wrapped from head to toe for home delivery.

Sound like fun?

The contest is open through December 12. To enter, go to Go Get Gifted, where you’ll be asked to put in your “shipping” information, including your name, email, departure city and destination city.

You’ll also be asked to choose how you’d like to be gift wrapped, including the wrapper paper print and bow style.

Then you’ll need to come up with a good reason (in 280 characters) why you should be wrapped and delivered.

Ready? Here’s the Go Get Gifted link.

If you win, please share a photo.

Travel Tidbits: free flight on JetBlue for do-gooders

Happy Friday!  Like surprises and volunteering for good causes?

Here’s a fun promotion from JetBlue you might want to consider.

 

As part of its “Destination Good”  free-flight promotion, JetBlue will be flying a plane full of contest winners to – somewhere – on November 27.

Once on the ground, all winners will be participating in three days of volunteer activities.

To enter: fill out a questionaire by October 26, 2018 or find one of the pop-up check-in kiosks JetBlue will be intalling in suprise locations in New York Ciity and Los Angels.

50 winners – and their guests – will be chosen to join JetBlue employees and other volunteers to head out from JFK for a surprise locaton on November 27 (Giving Tuesday) and will return November 30.

It’s not a totally random contest. According to the official rules, entries will be judged and winners selected based on the following judging criteria:

A. Connection of Philanthropic Answer to the Contest theme (30%);
B. General clarity and composition of the Philanthropic Answer (20%);
C. Use of creativity and originality in the Philanthropic Answer (20%);
D. Suitability of Philanthropic Answer for future promotion/presentation by Sponsor (20%);
E. Submitting an answer to the multiple choice questions (all complete Entries will receive the full score for Criterion E)
(10%)

So read the rules and spend some time thinking about your answers.

Winners will be notified on November 20 and will have to keep the destination a secret until November 27.

“Service is built into everything we do at JetBlue. It’s part of our DNA. Doing good can make a powerful impact any and everywhere,” said Icema Gibbs, director corporate social responsibility, JetBlue, said in a statement, “We’re excited to offer our customers the chance to once again roll up their sleeves and join us in giving back.”

 

 

Airlines growing their own food? It’s a thing.

Airlines growing their own food? It’s a thing. Korean Air recently invited me to visit the company’s ranch in South Korea where they farm livestock,  chicken, veggies, fruit and bottle their own water to serve to passengers.

Other airlines have farming projects underway as well.

I have story – with lots of photos- from my farm visit on USA TODAY’s Today in the Sky. Here are some highlights of the story.

Back in 1972, when beef was in short supply in South Korea, the then chairman of Korea Air’s parent group bought a 3,700 acre ranch on South Korea’s Jeju Island.

Imported Angus cattle got things started, but now the herd is about 2,200 Korean native cattle known as Hanwoo.

Meat from these animals, and from the farm’s flock of approximately 6000 free-range chickens, is sent to Korean Air’s flight catering kitchens in Seoul for use in meals served to first and business-class passengers.

In addition to raising cows and chickens, the ranch also produces fruit, vegetables – and bottled water – for Korean Air passengers.

The water bottling plant at the ranch has been operating for 35 years and there they make and fill cups and bottles of the airline’s branded ‘Hanjin Jeju Pure Water.’  The water is pumped from 1,070 feet underground and filtered through layers of the island’s volcanic rock.

Other airlines explore agriculture

In 2015 JetBlue debuted a large milk-crate garden outside Terminal 5 at New York’s John F Kennedy International Airport. Potatoes, vegetables and herbs grown there are donated to local food banks.

Japan Air Lines is creating a ‘you-pick’ agritourism attraction on land near Tokyo’s Narita International Airport that is scheduled to open in 2020. The carrier hopes to add food grown on that farm to in-flight and lounge menus.

And Emirates is having the world’s largest vertical farming facility built near the Dubai airport.  At full production, the daily harvest from the the 130,000-square foot facility should be about three tons of pesticide-free leafy greens that will be used in many of the meals Emirates Flight Catering prepares for 105 airlines and 25 airport lounges.