Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

DFW: 5 Things We Love About Dallas Fort Worth Int’l Airport

The “5 Things We Love About…” series on StuckatTheAirport.com celebrates features and amenities at airports around the world.

This installment of “5 Things We Love About…” lands at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), which sprawls out over almost 27 acres, with 7 runways and 164 gates.

1. The DFW Skylink

Skylink is the elevated train that connects all 5 terminals at DFW airport. Tracks run above and outside of the terminals, with a train pulling into terminal stations every 2-to-3 minutes. An 18-minute round-trip offers great views of the airfield throughout the airport.

Here are some more details about the Skylink system, shared when the system celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2015.

2. Founders’ Plaza

Dedicated in 1995, DFW’s Founders’ Plaza is an Observation Area and park near the airport offering great views of aircraft taking off and landing.

The park plaza has parking, picnic tables, telescopes, historic information, a commemorative monument and a radio broadcasting air traffic control communications from the FAA tower. Hours: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.

3. Gameway

Yes, DFW has a yoga studio. And a team of therapy dogs (DFW’s K9 Crew). But many people find relaxation in playing video games.

Luckily, DFW is home to 2 Gameway centers (at Gates E16 & B32) with a total of 36 gaming stations. Each station has a Playstation 4 Pro pre-loaded with games, a leather chair, 43″ 4K TV, noise-cancelling headphones, charging ports for your electronic devices and space to store your luggage. 

Pricing includes an option for unlimited play, which for some will be a perfect match for long layovers and delays.

4. Shopping at DFW

Big airports have lots of shopping options and DFW is no exception.

In December 2017, DFW Airport opened the largest duty-free store in the Americas. Over the years, we’ve scored plenty of charming and quirky Texas-themed souvenirs in shops throughout DFW as well.

5. Art at DFW Airport

DFW’s has a great art collection with more than 30 pieces of commissioned work including sculpture, paintings, mosaics and more. Many of the pieces are in International Terminal D and in the Skylink stations.

Did we miss a favorite amenity that you love at DFW airport? Add a note about in the comment section.

Have an airport you’d like to see featured in “5 Things We Love About…”? Leave a note below.

Want to sponsor the series or one of the installments? Drop a line.

Airports in the “5 Things We Love About …” series. So Far.

San Francisco International Airport (SFO)

Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX)

Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport (ICT)

Orlando International Airport (MCO)

Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport (GSP)Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW)

DFW airport adds yoga room

Do we detect a trend?

A few weeks back the first in-airport airport yoga room opened at San Francisco International Airport. Now comes word that there’s a yoga space at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Located behind a partial privacy screen, DFW’s free yoga studio is located in Terminal D at Gate D40 and is equipped with yoga mats, hand sanitizer and a view.

The studio was installed in connection with the DFW “LiveWell” Walking Path and is a few feet from the start/end point of the Terminal D walking path that was also unveiled on Wednesday April 4.

Stuck at DFW? Visit the observation park; learn something

DFW International Airport

DFW International Airport is big.

Within its 30 square miles are five terminals, two full-service hotels, a multi-million dollar collection of art and a golf course. There’s also Founders’ Plaza: DFW’s public observation park.

DFW Founders plaza

The park has the airport’s original beacon, along with shaded picnic tables, viewing stations and a live audio feed of the radio conversations from the air traffic control tower.

And now it has six, black-granite sidewalk medallions, each four-feet in diameter.

DFW Founder Plaza_ medallion

Laser-etched into the surface of each medallion is information about the history of the airport and of commercial aviation in north Texas. A different piece of the story is told on each medallion.

Want to see them for yourself? Founders’ Plaza is located at North Airfield Drive and Texan Trail, just south of State Highway 114 in Grapevine.

No time to leave the terminals? No problem. DFW has some nifty stuff inside as well. My favorites: the Cereality breakfast bar where you choose cereal and toppings and pajama-clad Cereologists fill up the bowl; the two La Bodega Winery locations and all the great artwork in Terminal D.

DFW ART in Terminal D

Photos courtesy DFW Airport.

Are airports ready for the new 3-hour rule? Are you?

(photo courtesy Daniel Incandela)

My column on USATODAY.com this month, Are airports ready for the 3-hour rule?, takes a look at how airports are gearing up for the April 29th roll-out of the new Department of Transportation (DOT) rule to upgrade protections for airline passengers.

We’ve been hearing a lot from airlines – they’re not happy – but I was curious about what the fall-out might be for airports if (when?) more planes end up turning around and coming back to the terminal and if (when?) more people end up stuck at the airport.

I was imagining I’d hear worry, maybe even hysteria, from airport officials.  That’s not what I got. In fact, the responses I got down the line were more along the lines of “We’re ready. Bring it on.”

You can read the complete column – and the very intriguing comments readers have been posting – on USATODAY.com.  Here’s some of what airport officials told me:

Airports at the ready

Long before the DOT announced enhanced protections for airline passengers, airports were holding meetings to work on creating tool kits and best practices that could be used during excessive flight delays. At Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, for example, executive vice president for operations Jim Crites says that in 2007 the airport began purchasing extra equipment to help deplane passengers quickly. DFW also started beefing up communications with airlines, with regional airports that might get diverted flights and with airport concessionaires that might need to stay open later than usual during irregular operations. “The customer expects everyone to be on the same page. So instead of doing business in isolation, you began to see more coordination, more teaming up and partnering across entities.”

It’s the same story at many small and medium-sized airports. “After that incident when people were stuck on a JetBlue plane in New York for nine hours we agreed as a management team that we would not let that happen here,” says Russell Widmar, the aviation director at California’s Fresno Yosemite International Airport, “So we’ve had our own passengers’ bill of rights in place for almost a year and a half now.”

The plan that the team worked out was successfully put to the test in January 2008, when severe weather on the California coast brought 14 diverted planes to Fresno Airport. “It really isn’t any problem dealing with extra flights,” says Widmar, “The only difficulty is that these passengers don’t want to be in Fresno. They want to be San Francisco or wherever they were headed. But if they end up here, no matter when they drop in, we have services available for them. No one needs to be stuck on the airplane.”

Widmar believes that by now pretty much every airport is ready to deal with this type of activity. That includes the many small airports not currently covered by the DOT contingency plan rule, such as Indiana’s Fort Wayne International Airport, which often get diverted flights from Chicago and Detroit. FWA executive director Tory Richardson says “The DOT rule is silent on how the coordination plans are to be handled at small airports, even though there are a few hundred of us. But we will step up … Nobody wants the black eye that happened in Rochester.”

Souvenir Sunday at DFW

It’s not just Sunday – it’s Souvenir Sunday! The day we unpack our bags and find all the stuff we bought when we were stuck at the airport.

This week, I roped some great stuff while spending a few hours at DFW International Airport.

There was plenty of Longhorn memorabilia to choose from –

And this chocolate bar  – which doubled as lunch.

And while the store clerk assured me those were real scorpions inside these lollipops,

I went home instead with a pocketful of these snazzy keychains.

Did you find  great souvenir last time you were stuck at the airport? If it’s under $10, “of” the city or region and, ideally, a bit offbeat, please snap a photo and send it along. Your souvenir may be featured on a future edition of Souvenir Sunday.