Museum of Flight

Museum of Flight and other museum openings

When we’re not in airports, we’re in museums. And right now we’re waiting for the green light to do both.

Here are some of the museums and museums exhibitions on our list.

Museum of Flight – March 4

The Museum of Flight in Seattle will reopen on Thursday, March 4 through Sunday, March 7. After that, the museum will be open every Thursday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. until further notice. Attendance will be limited to 25% capacity.

All five buildings on the 23-acre campus, including the open-air, 3-acre Aviation Pavilion will be available to visitors. Smaller galleries, some airplane cabins, and the flight simulators will be closed for COVID-19 safety. But the museum’s Air Force One, Boeing 747, and 787 Dreamliner will be open.

In the meantime, take advantage of the great virtual tours the Museum of Flight has created.

Louisville’s Unfiltered Truth Collection

The Unfiltered Truth Collection in Louisville, KY, launching in March 2012, will highlight the African American influence in Kentucky with a special focus on bourbon, horse racing industries, and Muhammad Ali.

Seven local attractions will be sharing new Black heritage experiences and historical perspectives. Two are already available. The Ideal Bartender Experience at Evan Williams celebrates the Black bartender who made the Old Fashioned famous in the first cocktail book, from 1917. The Kentucky Derby Museum’s new tour tells the story of the African Americans that once headlined the Thoroughbred racing scene.

Music for the Great Sun at Exhibit C Gallery

On March 1, Exhibit C, a Native American art gallery in Oklahoma City, OK owned by the Chickasaw Nation, debuts work by Native American glass artist Preston Singletary and Choctaw artist Marcus Amerman.

For his show, Music for the Great Sun, the two artists joined forces to create work inspired by ancient pieces that were originally made by the Cahokia Moundbuilders imperial craftsmen. The Great Sun was a divine god-king of the Cahokia Moundbuilders, and both the political and religious leader of this ancient class-stratified society.

Museum Monday: Where to see the Aerocar

We enter the new week still grounded by COVID-19, but dreaming of places we might soon be able to go.

And the fun ways we might get there.

In the meantime, we put together a round-up of some aviation museum highlights to visit, virtually, for The Points Guy blog.

On the list, we were pleased to be able to include one of our all-time favorite aviation artifacts: the Aerocar, which is part of the collection at Seattle’s Museum of Flight.

The museum recently posted a fun video of the museum curator describing the Taylor Aerocar III, which is one version of the flying car that Moulton Taylor built – and flew – in the 1950s.

Take a look at this 1949 news reel that shows the Aerocar taking flight.

Giant new aviation pavilion at Seattle’s Museum of Flight

Seattle’s sprawling Museum of Flight will double its gallery space with the official opening of a 3-acre Aviation Pavilion this Saturday.

aviation pavilion

The 9-story roofed outdoor gallery currently displays 15 commercial and military airplanes, including a Boeing 787 Dreamliner, the first Boeng 747 prototype, the only Concorde on the west coast and a FedEx Air Cargo exhibit housed inside a 727 freighter.

Tucked under the wings of the 747 is a mini-airport for kids.

Also on display: a Douglas DC-2 airliner from the 1930s, three big bombers (World War Two’s B-17F Flying Fortress and B-29 Superfortress), and the Cold War’s B-47 Stratojet.

The Museum’s rare, flyable 1932 Boeing 247, Boeing 727 prototype, and the first jet Air Force One will be moved over from the Museum’s Airpark across the street to the Pavilion in the fall.

Aviation pavilion 2

 

 

 

Westjet & others celebrate April Fools’ Day

In the spirit of the April Fools’ Day holiday, yesterday Virgin America shared its “new” logo.

Today, WestJet and others join the fun with RALFH – a replacement for airplane food carts:

Cheapflights brings up Hipster Air , an airline “for those who badly want to be in the know – but who don’t want others to know it. It guarantees that no airline will try so hard to not look like it is trying so hard.”

Hipster air

And Seattle’s Museum of Flight once again rolls out a unique April Fools exhibit. This year – it’s the Sopwith Camel airplane flown by World War I flying ace, Snoopy.

Museum of Flight snoopy

“The famous aircraft has never been seen in public, and until recently, historians have believed it among the thousands of fighter aircraft lost forever in combat over France nearly one hundred years ago,” the museum said in a statement that refers to the aircraft as “one of the greatest finds of the century.”

More fun to follow…

More April Fools’ Day aviation news

In addition to this list of April 1 travel tidbits sharing April Fools’ Day announcements from WestJet, Richard Branson and Denver International Airport, you should know about these April Fools’ Day announcements.

Southwest Airlines released a video saying “all the other guys are doing it,” so they were beginning a “bag fee bandwagon bonanza” based on bag color.

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Virgin Australia announced a special pre-flight lounge for pets.

 

Qantas Airways posted a note on its Facebook page announcing a slight change in the spelling of the carrier’s name:

Putting ‘U’ in QANTAS! So excited to today be adding a ‘U’ into our name, QANTAS, to acknowledge all of our passengers worldwide. Look out for the QUANTAS name change as of midday today!”

 

Delta Air Lines announced it would begin serving a version of its popular Biscoff cookies – made with kale.

Spirit Airlines announced Spirit Superiority Boarding at all U.S. airport locations.

Because “the boarding process for most airlines can be lengthy, confusing, and frankly insulting…these new boarding procedures will clear things up,” the airline said it a statement announcing a new line-up of boarding priorities that starts with gluten-free customers, members of the Illuminati, those with O-negative blood type and ends with people who eat kale and, finally… everyone else.

And, in Seattle, the Museum of Flight announced plans for adding real personality to some exhibits.

“Traditionally, an aerospace museum accessions an aircraft or spacecraft at the end of its service life to conserve and protect it for the enlightenment of future generations,” said museum spokesman Ted Huetter, “we now aim to treat the people in aerospace the same way. It’s that simple. And thanks to recent advances in the art of preserving human tissue, the exhibition of an aviator is no different from that of an old propeller or clock.”

Huetter noted that the museum has planes dating back to the 1920s and 1930s and that there are people alive today who flew in these planes. “When they pass away we will reunite them with the aircraft forever,” he said.