Art

Intergalactic art, artifacts at San Diego Int’l Airport

From the San Diego Air & Space Museum

A new year-long exhibition at San Diego International Airport (SAN) – Intergalactic Dreaming features 15 installations scattered throughout the airport that explore celestial phenomena and astronomy. Here is a sampling of some of the out-of-this world artwork.

Artwork by Don Porcella. Photo: Pablo Mason courtesy of San Diego International Airport

Collection of Edward Marsh.

 

Artwork by Sheena Rae Dowling

 

(All photos by Pablo Mason; Courtesy San Diego International Airport)

 

Fresh art at Denver International Airport

It’s easy to miss the Terminal Gallery at Denver International Airport, but it’s in the main Jeppesen Terminal, near the north security checkpoint, on level 5.

The space is used for changing exhibitions and through June 2017 the gallery is filled with work by Colorado metal sculptor Kevin Robb, who works in bronze and stainless steel.

On display are large photographic wall murals that give you a taste of some of the art’s monumental  public art pieces and his smaller, more intimate works.

(Photos courtesy Denver International Airport)

 

Fresh art at SFO and Austin-Bergstrom airports

Courtesy Austin-Bergstrom Int’l Airport

Next time you go to the airport, see some art:

At Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, there’s a new exhibit featuring traditional art and artifacts from Mexico and artwork on loan from Austin’s Mexic-Arte Museum.

Some pieces in “Connections & Intersections,” are on loan from the Mexican Consulate General’s office in Austin. Other pieces are from the Mexic-Arte Museum’s Changarrito program, which is a mobile art vending cart that provides Central American visual artists with an opportunity to showcase and sell their work in Austin.  Look for the exhibition through the end of April, post-security between gates 7 to 11.

And, it looks like surf’s up at San Francisco International Airport.

Pipeline, Oahu, Hawaii 1975; Jeff Divine

The SFO Museum is presenting a new exhibition featuring Jeff Devine’s photographs capturing legendary surfers in the 1970s and images of surf culture.

 

Gerry Lopez, Sunset Beach, Oahu, Hawaii 1974; by Jeff Divine – courtesy SFO Museum

Jeff Define: 1970s Surf Photography is on view at SFO Airport in the pre-security area of the Departures Level in Terminal 3 through May 18, 2017.

 

An arty take on the airline tray table

(By Pedro Campiche (NEW YORK CITY) – New York Skyline)

Delta Air Lines teamed up with Coca-Cola to use the tray tables on one of the airline’s airplanes as a gallery to show off 12 artist-made images of popular destinations around the world, including Amsterdam, Atlanta, London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, New York City, Paris, Sao Paulo, Seattle, Seoul, Shanghai and Tokyo.

In addition to showing the art on the tray tables of one 767 airplane, the original trays will be shown in Concourse A, between gates A15 and A11 at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

Here are a few more of the images:

This one is by Ping Zhu, from Shanghai.

The tray table art above – with Dutch waffles and bicyclists floating through flower-lined streets – is by Sac Magique of Amsterdam. The one below is Skip Hursch’s take on Mexico City, using a modern lens on traditional Central American textile design.

Here’s Stevie Gee’s take on Los Angeles.

And here’s how James Eads shares Paris.

 

Museum Monday: Games of Chance at SFO Airport

If, by chance, you’ve got some time before or between flights at San Francisco International Airport, you’re in luck.

That’s because the SFO Museum has just kicked off a new exhibition featuring more than sixty examples of early gambling devices, including the first automatic payout, three reel slot machine.

 

 

According to the exhibition notes, at one time San Francisco was a hotbed for these types of games:

In no part of the world did gambling take place so openly and on such a large scale than in San Francisco during the Victorian era. The city’s residents were largely pioneers or one generation removed from those who risked all to relocate and gamble on a new life in the West. San Franciscans wagered in nearly every possible manner, including horse races, sporting contests, card games, wheels-of-fortune, and impromptu barroom arguments on every conceivable subject. At the beginning of the twentieth century, more than 3,000 machines operated freely, enticing customers from busy sidewalks into the saloons and cigar stores that proliferated throughout San Francisco. “

 

 

The devices on display range from very early models that rely on simple clock mechanisms and a payout by the bartender to automatic slot machines with elaborate carved-wood, cast-iron, or painted-aluminum bodies – and each was designed to part a person with a small bit of their money.

 

 

All the objects in this exhibit (and all photos used here) are courtesy of Joe Welch American Antique Museum in San Bruno, California and will be on display at SFO Airport in Terminal 3, Boarding Area F through June 18, 2017.

You can see descriptions of the gambling devices featured here – and photos of others – in the SFO Museum’s online exhibition.  But I bet the exhibition is far more entertaining if you see it in person.