Etiquette

Airplane etiquette. From kids.

Courtesy FAA

We’re all delighted that travel is getting back to some sort of normal. And it is understandable that we’re all a bit rusty about our airplane etiquette.

But, already, airlines, the Federal Aviation Administration, rule-abiding passengers, and TSA have had it up to here with passengers refusing to wear masks, acting out, and being offensive on airplanes.

Some say the uptick in low behavior has to do with so many people being on edge about traveling after being cooped up for so long. But that’s hardly an excuse for some of the stories that are being shared round.

So if unruly passengers won’t listen to flight attendants, pilots, and other passengers about how to behave on a plane, perhaps they’ll listen to kids from this FAA video.

Travel Tidbits from JFK and LAX

For the next four months, 14 hand-drawn, large-scale illustrations of iconic New York city locations, such as the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, can be seen in the corridors of Terminal 4 at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

The work is hand-drawn by British-based artist Chris Dent and also includes 18 smaller illustrations of NYC staples such as subway trains, taxis, slices of pizza and coffee cups.

National Employee Appreciation Month is being marked at Los Angeles International Airport with a Gold Star recognition program that celebrates employees who provide great service.

To make it easy for travelers to nominate a badged LAX employee, the airport has created a web form.  Nominations can also be made by texting STAR to 52948. Anyone who works for the airport, airlines, concessions, service providers, TSA and Customs are eligible.

To encourage travelers to particpate,  LAX Guest Services staff will be in the terminals next week sharing information – and handing out goodies.

Twitter uproar over United Airlines “leggings-gate”

 

Debate rippled through the Twitter-verse – and beyond – on Sunday when a United Airlines gate agent told two girls flying on United employee passes that they could not board the plane wearing leggings.

Shannon Watts, founder of the anti-gun violence group MomsDemand, overhead part of the discussion and sent out a multi-part tweet to her followers.

After asking  if Watts was speaking with the passenger, United’s social media team initially tweeted that the airline had the right to refuse transport to passenger “not properly clothed.”

Then the airline learned that the ‘spandex girls’ were flying on a United employee pass, which comes with a dress code.

United’s dress code explanation – and subsequent comments by higher-up PR staff, came after Twitter was flooded with comments by people who were upset over girls being told what they could or could not wear – even when flying on free employee passes.

As you may imagine, the story was covered extensively throughout the day.

Here are good recaps from CNN, from the Runway Girl Network, from Flight Chic , and others, including flight attendant and author Heather Poole –

And a final word from United:

 

You’re not the only one on the plane

Wouldn’t it be be great if there was lots and lots of room between  you and the other people on the plane?

Rarely happens. So everyone just tries to get along and goes out of their way to not irritate their fellow passengers, right?

Fat chance.

According to the results of Expedia’s latest Airplane Etiquette Study – which polled Americans on the behaviors that most infuriate them when other passenger do them – rear-seat kicking bugs people the most.

The full ranked list of onboard etiquette violators includes:

  1. The Rear Seat Kicker (cited by 64 percent of respondents)
  2. Inattentive Parents (59 percent)
  3. The Aromatic Passenger (55 percent)
  4. The Audio Insensitive (49 percent)
  5. The Boozer (49 percent)
  6. Chatty Cathy (40 percent)
  7. The Queue Jumper (35 percent)
  8. Seat-Back Guy (35 percent)
  9. The Armrest Hog (34 percent)
  10. Pungent Foodies (30 percent)
  11. The Undresser (28 percent)
  12. The Amorous (28 percent)
  13. The Mad Bladder (22 percent)
  14. The Single and Ready to Mingle (18 percent)

“As we embark on 2017, millions and millions of people will be taking to the air this year, and should know that there’s no better gift you can give to a fellow traveler than respect and generosity,” said John Morrey, vice president and general manager, Expedia.com. “The Airplane Etiquette study shows that small acts of decorum can go a long way. After all, as it relates to flights, we are quite literally all in this together.”

(The study consisted of 1,005 interviews of randomly selected U.S. adult residents, conducted between December 2-4, 2016, among adults aged 18+.)