Posts in the category "Souvenirs":

Snack Saturday: Armadillo eggs & Texas Taffy

It’s Snack Saturday – when Stuck at The Airport shares snaps of some of the yummy and/or unusual snacks we’ve spotted at airports.

Here are some armadillo eggs and Texas Taffy sold at Dallas Love Field:

TEXAS SNACKS

May I take my pony on the plane?

The TSA has a handy “Can I bring my … through the security checkpoint” tool on its website which makes it clear that ice hockey sticks, field hockey sticks and “sports equipment that can be used as a bludgeon (such as bats and clubs) is prohibited in the cabin of the plane and must be transported in your checked baggage.”

But what about the stick ponies I spotted being sold in at least three shops at Dallas Love Field?

During my three hours hanging out at DAL earlier this week I didn’t see any small children (or adults) throwing tantrums for being relieved of their ponies at the aircraft doors, so I assume traveling with stick ponies is just fine.

But I’m still scouring the TSA app and will ask for a formal ruling…

Love Field ponies

Souvenir Sunday at Sydney Airport

It’s Souvenir Sunday – the day we take a look at some of the fun, inexpensive and locally-themed souvenirs you can pick up when you’re stuck at the airport.

Because who really needs a(nother) Gucci bag, a 5 pound bag of chocolate or a heavy glass bottle of duty-free scotch that will likely fall and break before you get it through customs and home to your house?

Sydney Boxing pens

I found this week’s treats at Sydney Airport, where I spent several hours before boarding a Qantas Airways A380 for its inaugural flight from Sydney to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. The flight marked the first time the world’s largest airplane flew on the world’s longest route.

Sydney airport assorted

Sydney Airport platypus

Airport trading cards: collect them all

MKE Trading Card Front

Baseball teams have them, some police forces have them and the TSA’s K-9 unit has them.

Now more than 20 North American airports have trading cards too.

Unveiled earlier this month, each card has the look and feel of a traditional baseball card. But instead of portraying a rookie player at bat, the cards in the North American Airport Collectors Series feature an iconic image of an airport on the front and geographic information, fun factoids and historical tidbits about the airport on the back.

The card for General Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee, for example, tells passengers about MKE’s free ping pong table and “recombobulation areas.” The card for Pittsburgh International Airport lays claims to being the first large U.S. airport to offer free wireless.

The idea for airport trading cards started at Lambert-St. Louis International, where “like a lot of other airports, we get calls from collectors all over the world asking for anything with the airport code on it,” said STL spokesman Jeff Lea.

Lambert’s trading card has iconic pictures of the airport’s two terminals on the front and, on the back, historical information, including STL’s connection to Charles Lindbergh.

STL_TradingCard_FRONT

“The cards are inexpensive to produce in bulk, so airports can hand them out for free at information booths and other places” said Lea. “It’s an old way to tell a new story and we know people will hold onto that one piece of cardboard longer than if you gave them a brochure or a pen.”

More importantly, the trading cards remind collectors, aviation enthusiasts and passengers that local airports are part of the larger aviation network, said Kevin Burke, President and CEO of ACI-NA, the trade group for airports in the United States and Canada.

PIT Trading card one

“Airports don’t get the attention they deserve and trading cards are one way to illustrate the importance of an airport in a community, especially the airport’s economic contribution,” said Burke, who plans to hand out airport trading cards, perhaps instead of briefing papers, when visiting elected officials in Washington, D.C.

Here are some of the other cards in the series.

CVG_card

SJC_card

SAN_card

(My story about airport trading cards first appeared as part of my At the Airport column on USA TODAY.)

Souvenir Sunday at Dusseldorf Airport

DUS REMEMBER

I stopped by Dusseldorf Airport last week to meet Ray, the airport’s new car parking robot, and learned that Remember had opened its first airport location just a few days earlier.

You may have seen the colorful products from this German company in design and decoration shops in museums, boutiques and bookstores, but airport officials were tickled that the company had chosen the DUS pre-security shopping arcade as its first airport outpost.

dus remember game

Among the bright and boldly patterned items that filled the newly installed shelves, I found games, dishware, notbooks, scarves and trays. But the souvenir that caught my eye were these Tripbooks.

DUS remember trip book

Like me, you may come home from a trip with a crude version of this created by a memo pad and an envelope stuffed with the ticket stubs and paper you’ve picked up along the way. But this handy notebook has both empty pages for travel notes and plenty of pocketed plastic sheets for saving and organizing small objects that help us remember where we’ve been.

DUS REMEMBER TRIP BOOK OPEN

I spotted the shop on my arrival in Dusseldorf and meant to go back before my departure to purchase a few for my next trips. But workmen were fiddling with the sliders on the glass door and the store was closed during the shopping hour I’d set aside before my flight.

So I have only these photos to help me remember Remember’s first airport shop.

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