Museums

Fresh art at SFO Airport features shoes from around the world

Combat boot, Mickey McGowan (Apple Cobbler), courtesy SFO Museum

 

The newest exhibition from the SFO Museum at San Francisco International Airport features footwear from around the world, including wedding shoes, early basketball sneakers, beaded moccasins, European clogs, Chinese children’s shoes, art shoes and more.

Here’s a sampling of the fantastic footwear on display in Stepping Out: Shoes in World Cultures, located pre-security in the International Terminal Main Hall Departures Lobby at San Francisco International Airport through November 12, 2017.

Snow boots (Japan, palm fiber). Courtesy SFO Museum

Moccasins c. 1940
Gwich’in Alaska; courtesy SFO Museum

Sneakers c. 1910
Hood Rubber Co.; courtesy SFO Museum

Museum Monday: At SFO, All Roads Lead to Rome

Capriccio view of anicent Roman monuments c 1755. From 17th–19th Century Architectural Souvenirs from the Collection of Piraneseum

The newest exhibition from the SFO Museum at San Francisco International Airport includes more than 70 artworks and objects depicting Roman architecture and monuments.

Why Rome?

“Rome was the world’s largest city from circa 100 BCE to 400 CE, and the cultural and political center of an empire lasting for more than a millennium,” the exhibit notes point out. “Its territory encompassed nearly fifty 21st century nations that owe much of their culture, religion, political systems, and infrastructure to Roman models. Arguably, Rome resonates most potently in its enduring architectural forms and public monuments, which were first widely disseminated in a very familiar method —through tourism.”

Arch of Titus c. 1830

 

In this exhibit, some items show how Rome’s structures and city places looked way back when. Others depict them as they appeared when the artwork now on display was first created. And many are souvenirs brought home by visitors to Rome.

Temple of Castor and Pollux – c. 1860

 

All the objects on view – and included here – are from the Collection of Piraneseum and curators David Weingarten and Lucia Howard, souvenir collectors of the best sort.

Arch of Constantine – c 1820

All Roads Lead to Rome: 17th–19th Century Architectural Souvenirs from the Collection of Piraneseum is located pre-security in the International Terminal Main Hall Departures Lobby, San Francisco International Airport through August 13, 2017.

Around the world in paper models

Builidng Museum 1

As souvenirs go, paper models are easy to transport, but can sometimes be challenging to put together when you get home.

Anyone who has tried that will appreciate the exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., which features selections from a 4,500-piece collection of architectural paper models representing buildings, cultures, and countries from Austria to Wales.

The collection includes examples of hand-drawn castles, intricate cathedrals with water-colored gardens, and micro-models smaller than a postcard and will be on display through April, 2017.

Some are shown flat; others are copied and constructed in 3-D and after touring the exhibit, visitors will get the chance to build their own models.

All paper models in this exhibition are from the Kemnitzer Paper Model Collection housed at the National Building Museum and represent all 50 states and multiple countries, as well as many imaginary buildings such as farms, forts, villages, skyscrapers, and castles.

Here are some samples:

Buidling museum 3

Building museum stadium

Want to make your own model? Here are links to some downloadable samples, including the National Building Museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture and a suspension bridge.

Museum Monday: SPAM Museum reopening

If you’re a fan of the tinned meat product known as SPAM – or just enjoy a good offbeat museum – then you have a new reason to plan a trip to southeastern Minnesota: the Spam Museum is set to reopen on April 22, 2016.

Hormel's SPAM MUSEUM reopens April 22 in a new spot in downtown Austin, Minnesota.

The museum is located in Austin, Minnesota – home of SPAM manufacturer Hormel Foods Corporation – and has been closed since September 2014 in preparation for a move from just outside of Austin’s downtown to a spot right in downtown.

One of the new exhibits in the SPAM Museum - opening April 22 in Austin, Minn. Courtesy SPAM Museum

Some new galleries have been created, but Hormel made sure to keep the more popular exhibits, including one exploring Spam’s connection to the military and the production line game where guests can simulate making Spam.

SPAMples, the Spam Museum’s version of free samples, will continue as well.

Why did they move the Spam Museum?

To be neighborly.

Since 2001, the Spam Museum welcomed visitors first from a spot in a local mall and later from a building attached to Hormel corporate headquarters, just off Interstate 90.

But stopping at the museum didn’t require a drive through Austin (population: 25,000), which meant most visitors never ventured into the town’s historic shop and restaurant-filled downtown.

So when it came time for a new and bigger spot for the museum, members of Vision 2020 – a community group working to improve the quality of life in Austin by the year 2020 – urged Hormel to move the museum to Austin’s Main Street.

Hormel agreed. And now finishing touches are being put on the Spam Museum, which has scheduled its soft opening for April 22 and a grand opening in July as part of Hormel’s 125th anniversary celebration.

SPAM production line