airport carpets

Wacky carpet exchange between Portland and Orlando airports

On  Thursday, March 16, Alaska Airlines kicked off flights between Orlando and Portland.

To mark the day – and with a nod to PDX carpet that became a national celebrity – Portland International Airport and Orlando International Airport did a carpet exchange.

Here’s how it went down on Twitter.

How to get a piece of the PDX carpet

2_PDX_Foot-forward selfies with the PDX carpet are very popular at Portland Int'l Airport

Want a piece of the world’s most famous airport carpet?

Now’s your chance.

The 30-year old green, blue and pink carpeting in the terminals at Portland International Airport became an iconic symbol of home celebrated on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Now, to the chagrin of hipsters in the hippest of cities, the PDX carpet is being replaced.

Souvenirs mimicking the rug’s criss-cross runway pattern exist on everything from socks, caps and water bottles to tote bags, sneakers and bike helmets.

But because there’s nothing like the real thing – and because so many PDX carpet fans and creative entrepreneurs want pieces of the real rug the airport is replacing – PDX officials decided to take applications and choose a few groups that would be awarded 1,000 square-yard carpets sections to use for creative re-purposing projects.

Four local organizations were chosen from an applicant pool of 32 and they will each get their coveted cache of carpet sometime in May.

City Liquidators plans to make welcome mats and rugs out of the portion of the PDX carpet it receives.

Carpet Mill Outlet will make large sections of its PDX carpet allotment available for installation and create bound area rugs with the rest.

Sling Chair 'in the works' at The PDX Project

The PDX Project hopes to make area rugs, door mats, sling chairs (above), and cat accessories.

And MyPDXCarpet.com , is taking pre-orders for products that include pieces of the carpet bound and unbound, coasters and sections of carpet suitable for framing.

Cool, quirky airport carpets

2_PDX_Foot-forward selfies with the PDX carpet are very popular at Portland Int'l Airport

Foot-forward selfies with the carpet are popular at PDX.

 

It’s usually a bit of an inconvenience, but not that big a deal, when an airport changes out the carpeting in the terminals.

But because the current carpet at Portland International Airport has become a social media sensation, all manner of media will be on hand Friday when construction crews begin removing the existing carpet at PDX and preparing the floor for the installation of 13 acres of new carpet—enough to cover nearly 10 football fields.

6__PDX_ A sample of the new carpet design, scheduled to begin being installed over the next year.

This is what the new PDX carpet will look like.

 

Here’s the story of the PDX carpet and a round-of of some quirky airport carpets found at other airports around the country that I put together for my “At the Airport” column on USA Today.

Installed in the late 1980s, the old PDX carpet sports a geometric pattern inspired by the airport’s intersecting north-south runways and was for years an ignored part of the airport décor.

1_Sample of the current_old carpet pattern at Portland International Airport

But then Portland began celebrating its core weirdness, social media became the big thing, and the rug became a hip symbol of home celebrated on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and with souvenirs ranging from socks, caps and water bottles to T-shirts, mugs, tote bags and bike helmets.

4_Portland Int'l Airport Carpet water bottles

Carpet-inspired art and ale followed: Nancy Wilkins’s 11-foot by 16-foot collage, made of pieces of PDX carpet and titled “Carpet Diem!” was recently installed at the airport and Oregon-based Rogue Ales & Spirits just introduced PDX Carpet IPA.

7_PDX_Carpet Diem! _ Artwork by Nancy Wilson celebrating the Portland Airport carpet.

5_PDX_new on the market_ PDX Capret IPA

PDX isn’t the only airport to forgo tile, terrazzo or other hard flooring in favor of rugs more difficult to maintain, but worth a second look.

When it was time to order 10.5 acres of new carpeting for its three terminals, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport looked for something that would hold up to high foot traffic and repeated cleaning, and be easily recycled when it came time for replacement.

In 2005, PHX got all that (at the cost of $34.66 per square yard) plus a cool, custom pattern that looks like an aircraft on a radar screen.

8_PHX_The carpet at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport has an aviation-inspired design

In the pedestrian walkway between Terminal A and the parking garage at Sacramento International Airport, travelers walk across the 150-foot-long “Flying Carpet” created by artist Seyed Alavi. Installed in 2005, the woven, woolen carpet portrays a digital, aerial image of about 50 miles of the Sacramento River and nearby farm fields and orchards.

9_SMF-Flying Carpet rug offers a digita aerial view of the Sacramento  River, farm fields and other landscape.

Part of an “Art in Public Places” project, the commission for SMF’s Flying Carpet included a duplicate version of the rug that has been in storage.

There are no socks, caps, beer or other official souvenirs (yet) bearing the carpet patterns from Phoenix Sky Harbor or Sacramento International Airports, but visitors regularly post images of the carpets on social media.

12_Nashville International Airport_ the carpet reflect a celebration of music.

With subtle musical notes and musical instruments throughout, the carpet at Nashville International Airport celebrates Music City.

Denver International Airport recently installed 42,000 square yards of new carpeting in Concourse B and 25,000 square yards of new carpeting in Concourse C, at a cost of $2.5 million and $1.7 million respectively. The pattern isn’t aviation-themed, but casually references rivers and streams (in the walking areas) and (in the seating areas) things passengers often see out the windows at DEN: rain and snow.

11_Denver International Airport _Some sections of the recently installed carpet references rivers and streams

The pattern in the 33 acres of teal and white carpeting at Orlando International Airport is quite simple but, along with plenty of light, water and live landscaping, is in keeping with the goal of creating an environment that is comfortable, people-friendly.

14_Orlando International Airport_carpeting and, water features, lots of light and live landscaping are part of the Orlando Experience

Meanwhile, back at Portland International Airport, the old carpet will be gone, but not forgotten: a limited number of 1,000 square yard sections of the old carpet will be made available to winning applicants who will likely sell or give it away small bits of the carpet to others.