Air Travel

Two ways to fly free on JetBlue

If you’re lucky – or fast – you might score a free flight – or a year’s worth of flights – on JetBlue this week.

As part of the carrier’s newest version of its All You Can Jet promotion, anyone who purchases a non-refundable ticket on jetblue.com by December 15, 2017 is entered into a contest that will award 3 lucky winners an All You Can Jet pass good for flights for the winner and a companion anywhere the airline flies – for one year. Winners will be announced December 27, 2017.

(More details – including a way to enter without purchasing a ticket – can be found here.)

Another way to get a free flight is to purchase a JetBlue Get Packing board game, which goes on sale at Amazon for $19.99 today (December 12, 2017) at 12 p.m.

Each game comes with a roundtrip JetBlue flight certificate for JetBlue flights to/from JetBlue cities on JetBlue-operated flights. (All travel must be booked and flown within January 2018 – December 2018.)

Good luck!

Comparing airlines, airports by on-time performance

Travelers use all manner of measurements to choose an airline to fly on or an airport to fly through and beyond price, punctuality is high on some lists.

Flight informatoin company OAG gathers oodles of on-time performance data and twice each year shares an ‘award’ ranking airlines and airports with OTP star ratings, 5 being the best.

For U.S. airlines, the latest list – found here – give high marks to Delta’s performance.

“It not only topped its mainline competition, but finished ahead of smaller airlines such as Alaska Airlines and Sun Country Airlines,” OAG notes. “In a U.S. air travel ecosystem that relies on major hubs, it’s easy for a single delay or cancellation to knock an entire day of flights off schedule. Despite managing one of the largest fleets in the world, Delta has remained a cut above its competitors. Southwest (78.9 OTP), American (78.8 OTP) and United (78.5 OTP) all performed admirably, earning 3 stars respectively.”

When it comes to airports, the standouts are Salt Lake City International Airport (earning 5 stars for an 85.2 percent on-time performance), Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (82.9 percent), Detroit Metropolitan Airport (83.1 percent), Charlotte Douglas International Airport (82.2 percent) and Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport (85.1 percent).

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Hurricanes havoc for airports and air travelers

(Photo courtesy Keene Public Library, via Flickr)

Hurricane Irma, and the two hurricanes just behind it, continue to wreak havoc for airports, air travelers and airlines in the Caribbean and – momentarily – in the southeastern United States.

As thousands of flights to and from Florida airports and others in the hurricane’s projected path are being cancelled, some airlines are rushing to add extra flights to get passengers out of Florida and the Caribbean. Many airlines are also bringing in extra supplies for recovery efforts.

Miami International Airport released a statement reminding travelers that the airport is not a designated storm shelter and that the airport’s parking garage is already at capacity.

American Airlines has issued a statement saying it is planning to wind down its operations at Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Fort Myers and West Palm Beach airports on Friday afternoon, with all operations canceled through the weekend. American Airlines’ operations at Orlando International Airport were scheduled to end by 2 p.m. Saturday, with all of its Sunday flights canceled; Orlando International Airport is planning to close for all flights at 5 pm.

In advance of the shutdowns, American added 16 extra flights out of Miami, including 12 from to Dallas/Fort Worth, one to Philadelphia, and three to New York.

Other airports are adding some extra flights as well.

Regarding fares, and the rumors of price gouging, American said it has capped fares at $99 each way for Main Cabin, and $199 for the premium cabin, on direct, single leg flights to/from cities covered under the Travel Alert, which is now in place for more than 40 airports. The carrier said the fares will apply for flights out of the affected area through Sept. 17, and returning to the affected area from Sept. 10-17.

Here are links to domestic airline travel alerts. Many airlines have considerably expanded the dates and the airports included by their advisories and are adjusting them as the storms progress.

Alaska Airlines

American Airlines. More than 40 airports currently covered by the alert.

Delta Air Lines

Frontier Airlines

Hawaiian Airlines

JetBlue

Southwest Airlines

Spirit Airlines

United Airlines

Virgin America

Airline travel Alerts for Hurricane Irma

 

Move over, Harvey.

Hurricane Irma has just hit Category 5 status and is headed for the Caribbean and, most likely, Florida.

Here are links to posted travel alerts from airlines and their current policies on canceling flights and waiving change fees. Stay safe out there. And if you do have travel planned to the region, keep checking the airline webistes as the travel waivers are likely to expand and be extended as the storm moves along.

American Airlines Travel alert currently covers travel to/from or through 8 airports, including, San Juan, for travel scheduled September 5-8.

Delta Air Lines – Travel alert currently covers travel to/from or through San Juan, PR (SJU), St. Croix, VI (STX), St. Maarten, SX (SXM) and St. Thomas, VI (STT) for travel scheduled September 5-6.

Frontier Airlines has a travel for   San Juan, PR and Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (PUJ) for travel scheduled through September 8

JetBlue Travel alert for affecting 8 airports, including San Juan, PR is in effect for travel scheduled through September 6.

Spirit Airlines Travel alert currently affecting 6 airport for travel booked through September 8.

Southwest Airlines has issued a travel advisory for flights booked through Sept 8 to/from San Juan, PR and Punta Canta (PUJ)

United Airlines has a travel alert posted for travel through Sept 7 to San Juan, PR and Aguadilla, PR (BQN).

 

“Zilch” and other compensation airlines may owe you 

Whether or not the power outage that caused British Airways to cancel all flights from London’s Heathrow and Gatwick airport last weekend was caused by a worker pulling the wrong plug, the airline is looking at perhaps $100 million in compensation payouts to thousands of passengers whose travelers were disrupted by the snafu.

While acknowledging that it may take “a little longer than normal to process all of the payments,” due to the volume of customers affected, on its website British Airlines is assuring passengers whose plans were put into disarray by the outage that it will comply with European Union Regulation 261/2004.

The rule outlines the compensation airlines must pay passengers for flights that are delayed or canceled and covers scheduled flights to or from airports in EU countries (as well as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and some other non-EU regions) as well as flights to and from the EU  purchased on U.S. carriers but operated by a EU carrier.

“It’s who you’re flying not where you’re buying,” notes George Hobica of Airfarewatchdog.com.

“If it’s within the airlines’ reasonable control, then compensation kicks in, which can max out at 600 euros,” said Hobica, “Getting paid is another thing, and can involve paperwork and waiting or negotiating, which is why there are a half dozen firms that will do the work for you, for a cut of the money owed.”

But at least those passengers have the law on their side.

On US, Canadian, Middle Eastern, or other non-Euro airline flights that are delayed or canceled due to IT outages, mechanical issues, crew delays or other issues within an airline’s control, passengers are legally due “zilch, nada, nothing. Nothing mandated by law” said Hobica,

That doesn’t mean passengers always get nothing, though.

Policies outlining what services are provided to a customer waiting in the airport vary by airline and are contained in their contracts of carriage, advises consumer organization Flyersrights, noting that the contracts of carriage generally leave it to the airline’s discretion to distribute meal vouchers and hotel accommodations.

Delta Air Lines outlines its policies on situations such as delays, cancellations, diversions and bumped passengers in its Customer Commitment document.

For example, the airline promises to “provide hotel accommodations at Delta contracted facilities, based on availability, if you are inconvenienced overnight while away from your home or destination due to a delay, misconnect or cancellation within Delta’s control.”

In August 2016, the carrier went the extra step of offering $200 in travel vouchers to customers whose flights were cancelled or who were delayed by more than three hours due to a system wide IT incident.

United Airlines spokeswoman Maddie King said the company strives to provide customers with flexible travel options when there are unanticipated interruptions to operations.

“We actively assist in rebooking customers and often provide compensation for customers who experience extensive delays that are within our control,” said King, “During severe interruptions we will provide customers with a travel waiver to change their flights at no cost. (United’s policies on flight delays and cancellations are posted here.)

And JetBlue’s Customer Bill of Rights outlines, in perhaps the industry’s most straightforward language, what customers can expect from the airline “when things do not go as planned,” including specific credit amounts to be issued for cancellations and delays.

On its website, the U.S. Department of Transportation confirms that “for domestic itineraries, airlines are not required to compensate passengers whose flights are delayed or canceled,” but does note a few situations that are covered by laws, including situations involving involuntary bumping of passengers, in which case required compensation can reach 400 percent of a one-way fare, but not more than $1,350.

As result of the recent United Airlines ‘incident’ involving a man being dragged of a flight in an involuntary bumping situation, United Airlines has issued policy changes which include the promise to offer passengers up to $10,000 to voluntary give up their seats in an effort to avoid having future overbooked flight situations.

Likewise, Delta has stated that it will offer up to $9,950 to passengers who volunteer to give up their seats on overbooked flights, said Zach Honig, editor at ThePointsGuy.com, “Though I wouldn’t be surprised if we never hear of the airline paying out compensation approaching that amount. Chances are enough travelers will volunteer long before the compensation offer gets well into the thousands.”

(My story about airline compensation for ‘inconvenienced’ passengers first appeared on NBC News.