Posts in the category "Museums":

Bruce Lee & 150+ museums free this weekend

If you’re home or on the road this weekend, and have a Bank or America or Merill Lynch credit or debit card, you’re eligible for free admission at more than 150 museums, science centers and gardens around the country, courtesy of the Museums on Us program, which makes the same offer the first full weekend of each month.

Kiss V, 1964, Roy Lichtenstein, courtesy Seattle Art Museum. Collection Simonyi, © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, Photo: Eduardo Calderon.

If you’re in Seattle, that means you can get free admission to the Seattle Art Museum (regular admission: $19.50), which is currently showing a great pop art exhibition.

Another great option: The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, which is the only place outside of Hong Kong to have an exhibition about martial arts and film star Bruce Lee, who had deep connections to Seattle and is buried at Lake View Cemetery

Bruce Lee - Wing Luke Bruce Lee on the set of ‘Way of the Dragon’ – courtesy of The Wing and Bruce Lee Enterprises.

City break: free dinos and glittering gems in Dallas

If you’ve flying somewhere this weekend and have a free afternoon, check your wallet. There may be free dinosaurs or art treasures in there.

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If you’re a Bank of America or Merrill Lynch credit or debit card holder, you’re eligible for a free admission at more than 150 museums around the country – a perk that returns on the first weekend each month as part of the long running Museums on Us program.

If you’re near Dallas, for example, you’ll get free entry at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science , where general admission is $15.

As I learned during an all-too-short visit this week, the museum has five floors filled with 11 interactive permanent exhibits offering everything from dazzling gems and minerals to a bird hall, a dinosaur-filled then and now exhibit and the opportunity to learn about and explore sport, science and space.

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New vintage race car at Indianapolis Int’l Airport

IND GRAY GHOST

Cars inside an airport?

That’s a regular thing at Indianapolis International Airport, where the Dowgard Special #2 – known as The Grey Ghost – has joined the line-up of classic racing cars on loan from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

Here’s some information about the car:

It was built in 1958-59 by Eddie Kuzma and was driven on one-mile tracks by Jim Rathmann, Ed Elisian, Bobby Grim, Jimmy McElreath and two-time National Champion Tony Bettenhausen, who won with it at Phoenix in 1959.

It became known as “The Grey Ghost” after a rush repair job in 1962 led to an appearance at a track in gray primer. Look for it on Concourse B near the exit to Civic Plaza.

The airport’s release also refers to the racing car as a ‘dirt car’ – and says that, according to the museum, other than the Indianapolis 500, most National Championship races held between the early 1930s and the late 1950s were dirt track “100-milers,” with the popular events still counting toward the national title as late as 1970. These dual-purpose, solidly built cars won the 500 in 1950, ’51 and ’52, and were still in the lineup as late as 1956.

Museum Monday: Hawaii by Air exhibit

Hawaii by Air

Courtesy National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Dreaming of a trip to Hawaii?

So, evidently, are the curators at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

They’ve put together “Hawaii by Air,” an exhibition featuring Hawaiian travel posters, photographs and ephemera that explores how air travel to Hawaii developed and grew, how the travel experience evolved along with the airplane and how air travel changed Hawaii.

Also on display: airplane models, airline uniform badges, historic film footage, a high-resolution satellite image of the islands, broadcasts from a vintage Hawaiian radio show and live Hawaiian plants.

pan am brochure

National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Hawaii, exhibition notes remind us, is one of the most remote places on Earth. It got its first air service in 1935 and, by 1936 Pan American Airways was delivering passengers on its famous flying clipper ships.

From the exhibition notes:

“Flying to Hawaii was luxurious but expensive; most people still traveled by ocean liner. That changed after World War II, when new propeller-driven airliners and then jets made travel to this remote destination much more common, comfortable and affordable. Hawaii experienced a tourism boom that exceeded all expectations.”

The exhibit runs through July 2015.

Continental Hawaii

National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Five Hall of Fame Museums Worth a Visit

Next to airports, museums – especially the odd ones – are my thing.

Here’s a piece I put together for TODAY.com Travel about Hall of Fame Museums that are definitely worth a visit.

4. Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame

The National Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame is housed inside a giant steel, concrete and fiberglass fish. Courtesy of the museum.

“The best halls of fame also offer a museum experience,” said Doug Kirby, publisher of RoadsideAmerica.com. “That helps provide context about the history, industry and achievements of those enshrined on plaques.”

Among his favorites are the US National Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame and Museum in Ishpeming, Michigan, which honors the sport’s best athletes and its history, and the International Towing and Recovery Museum, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, which has a Hall of Fame saluting “the movers and shakers of an industry dedicated to hauling broken-down vehicles safely off America’s highways.”

Here are a few other halls of fame you won’t want to miss:

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Image: The baseball Babe Ruth hit for his final career big league home run in 1935 is on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York.

The ball Babe Ruth hit for his final career big league home run in 1935 is on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Courtesy Milo Stewart Jr. / National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

As many as 300,000 visitors make the trek to Cooperstown, New York, each year to visit and pay respects to the heroes of the game called “America’s pastime.”

Three floors of artifact-filled exhibits document baseball history, and bronze plaques honor each Hall of Famer. During this summer’s Hall of Fame Weekend (July 25-28) more than 50 Hall of Fame legends, including Hank Aaron, Cal Ripken and Sandy Koufax will be on hand to help celebrate the Class of 2014 inductees Bobby Cox, Tom Glavine, Tony La Russa, Greg Maddux, Frank Thomas and Joe Torre.

If you go: Open daily (except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day). Admission: $19.50 for adults; Children 7-12: $7.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

2. Courtesy Rock&RollHallofFame&Museum

A new exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame & Museum includes the outfit Lady Gaga wore in the video for “Bad Romance.” Courtesy of the museum.

This museum in Cleveland, Ohio, holds a star-studded ceremony each spring for its newest inductees. Performers inducted this year included Kiss, Nirvana, Linda Ronstadt and the E Street Band.

The museum displays iconic rock ‘n’ roll artifacts year-round, including the most comprehensive exhibit of Beatles’ items, and offers special exhibits, such as “Right Here, Right Now,” which invites visitors of different generations to learn “how the roots and pivotal moments in rock and roll influenced current artists and the future of music,” said museum spokesman Todd Mesek.

If you go: Open daily. Adults: $22; Kids 9-12: $13.

The Strong

National Toy Hall of Fame

Courtesy The Strong

At this Rochester, New York, museum devoted to the history of play, a new batch of popular and well-loved toys is inducted in the National Toy Hall of Fame each November.

“The types of toys people have played with over time tells us a great deal about our cultural history,” said Shane Rhinewald, spokesman for The Strong. “Because of this, the National Toy Hall of Fame recognizes toys that have inspired creative play and enjoyed popularity over multiple generations.”

Past winners have included Barbie (1998), the cardboard box (2005) and dominoes (2012).

In addition to a gallery celebrating the more than 50 toys that have been inducted into the hall of fame so far, the museum offers a plethora of interactive play areas and exhibits filled with historic toys and games.

If you go: Open 362 days a year. Age 2 and older: $13.50.

Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum

Part museum, part hall of fame, this Hayward, Wisconsin, attraction is a shrine to anglers built inside the “Big Musky,” a 143-foot-long, 41-foot-tall concrete, steel and fiberglass fish.

In addition to mounted specimens, fishing gear and more than 50,000 vintage and historical fishing artifacts, the hall tracks freshwater fishing world records and honors legendary anglers, fishing guides and artists who have tackled fishing themes.

If you go: Open daily, April 15 through October. Admission: $7 adults; $5 kids 10-17.

RV/MH Hall of Fame

5. RV_MH HALL OF FAME

Courtesy RV/MH Hall of Fame

This Elkhart, Indiana, attraction not only honors the leaders of the recreational vehicle and motor home industry, it documents the history of the vehicles and displays a treasure-trove of trailers reaching back to the 1920s and 1930s. Included along a winding “highway” that runs through the building are Mae West’s 1931 Chevrolet Housecar and a 1954 Yellowstone, an unusual 18-foot-long trailer that was equipped with residential-type appliances and two doors.

If you go: Open daily. Admission: $10 adults; $7 youth 6-18.

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