Food

Ice-cream flavor honors Portland Int’l Airport

Portland, Oregon-based ice-cream maker Salt & Straw  has created a special ice-cream in honor of the award-winning Portland International Airport.

Called “PDX Rainwater and Spruce Tips,” the ice-cream celebrates the experience of arriving at PDX, which Salt & Straw describes as “being swarmed by the misty rain as Mt. Hood comes into view, soaking up a deep breath of spruce-laced Pacific Northwest air, being chilled to your bones and loving every moment of it.”

To make the ice-cream, Salt & Straw simmered Doug Fir tea and spruce needles in Oregon rain water and some Jacobsen Salt (harvested from Oregon Coast) and hazelnut bark brittle made with a some local Cocanu chocolate.

Sound intriguing?

Salt & Straw will be handing out free samples of the airport-themed ice-cream at PDX Airport on Wednesday, September 13 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m on Concourse D.

Larger, single scoop cups of the creamy treat will be for sale at the airport  – at Tender Loving Empire and Country Cat – and in town at the Salt & Straw shops from September 13–17 to coincide with Feast Portland.

 

(Photo courtesy Salt & Straw)

 

 

Free food from United Airlines – on the ground

You may not be getting served complimentary meals in the air, but in Manhattan and San Francisco, United Airlines  is sending out food trucks stocked with complimentary food items inspired by some of the places the airline flies to from Newark and San Francisco.

This week in New York the food truck will be distributing pastries that include rugelach and black & white cookies to celebrate the Newark to Tel Aviv route.

Beginning, July 31, the food truck will be handing out Dulce de Leche doughnuts and coconut cream pineapple doughnuts in honor of the Buenos Aires route.

And starting August 7, to celebrate service to Narita, Japan , the United food truck will offer cherry doughnuts and “Yuzu” lemon zest doughnuts.

In San Francisco, the food truck will be promoting the new SFO to Munich route with horseshoe almond and apple crumb cakes daily.

To find out where the trucks are located in New York, you’ll need to follow @SweeteryNYC on Twitter.

There is no Twitter handle offering clues on where the truck will be in San Francisco, but United says look for it in these neighborhoods:

South of Market – Brannan St

Financial district – Sansome

Outside San Francisco (Retail) – Mission Bay Blvd. N

Flying cherries to China

You may think ‘apples’ when you think of produce that is plentiful in the Northwest, but cherries – Bing, Rainier, Chelan, Lapin and other varieties – take pride of place here too.

In the past five years the Northwest Cherry Industry packed and sold an average of 196,000 tons of fresh cherries, reaching an all time high of 232,000 tons in 2014.

Weather conditions are good for cherries this year and growers are expecting perhaps another record crop.

Getting to eat fresh cherries is a treat here in the U.S. this time of year but, as I learned at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport,  about 30 percent of the Northwest cherry crop gets exported, with most of the our best cherries going to China. There, cherries that can sometimes approach the size of golf balls (!) sell for up to $1 a piece, according to Keith Hu of the Northwest Cherry Growers.

This cherry-themed Boeing 777 freighter operated by China Cargo (a division of China Eastern Airlines) and dubbed the “Cherry Express” is just one of the planes used to ferry Northwest cherries to Asia to the tune of more than 40 million pounds in 2016 and possibly more this year. And that’s just the cherries that fly via Seattle.

During the season an average of 6 or 7 freighters filled with cherries leave Seattle for China, and Korea, with more cherries flying out of airports in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Chicago to accommodate demand, according to Hu.

Premium Northwest cherries in Asia can sell for up to $10 a pound, said Hu, and are considered  a “unique, rare, safe, nutritional and sexy product.”


Pallets of Northwest cherries make it from the trees to grocery shops in Asia in just a few days.

Why you should go to Newark Airport hungry

There is now a very sweet, very fresh and very good reason to go to the airport hungry – if you’re flying through United Airline’s Terminal C and Newark Liberty International Airport.

United Airlines and OTG are finishing up a $120 million “re-imagining” of Terminal C at EWR, creating 55 new restaurants, bars and food markets. One of the new venues – the Mélange Bakery Café – includes what is likely the first 24-hour production bakery inside an airport.

The staff there is not only creating croissants, macarons, gourmet chocolates, bagels, doughnuts and other pastries for café customers, but for all the food outlets in the terminal.

It’s a tall order, and consulting Chef Jacques Torres (aka “Mr. Chocolate) wasn’t quite sure the staff of two executive pastry chefs and team of round-the-clock bakers could pull off making everything fresh on the premises in an airport, but during an opening celebration on Tuesday Torres said, “It works! It’s unusual for an airport, but the beauty is everything goes from the oven to the store, just like the bakeries in France.”

Here’s what Melange plans to bake each day: more than 1,000 croissants, assorted pastries and buns; more than 1,200 hand-rolled New York-style bagels (including rainbow bagels); 600+ muffins; 200+ hand-crafted chocolate bars; 12 types of macaroons; 10 varieties of doughnuts, such as Passion Fruit and Maple Bacon, six varieties of sweet and savory eclairs and lots of cupcakes.

Find Mélange in the Global Bazaar on the C1 Concourse in United’s Newark Liberty Terminal C, by Gates 90-91.