Fashion

Airport amenities coming – and going – soon

 

Airports – good ones –  do their best to offer service and amenities that will make your time in the terminal bearable and, increasingly, enjoyable.

What amenities are offered most?

What amenities are airports poised to add?

And what amenities are disappearing from airports?

 

The folks at Airports Council International – North America (ACI-NA) did a survey of their members to find out and are sharing the results today of the 2017 ACI-NA Guest Experience Management and Passenger Amenities Survey.

The top 10 most commonly offered airport amenities and services in 2017 are:

  1. ATM Services
  2. Gift Shops / News Stands
  3. Airport Websites
  4. Electrical Charging Stations
  5. Restaurants and Bars
  6. Lost and Found
  7. Parking / Taxi and Limousine Services
  8. Free Wi-Fi
  9. Pre-Security Pet Relief Facilities
  10. Food and Beverage Vending Machines

No big surprises there, but ACI-NA found out that over the next three to five years, passengers can expect new and expanded airport amenities and services such as:

  1. Nursing mothers’ rooms and pods
  2. Post-security pet relief facilities
  3. Children’s play areas
  4. Airfield observation areas
  5. Adult changing and washroom facilities.

And, as passenger needs change, ACI-NA notes, airports are beginning to phase out unnecessary or redundant amenities and services.

So, get ready to say bye-bye over the next three to five years to: payphones, banking services, and smoking rooms at airports.

Why no more pay phones?

“Pay phones take up a lot of valuable real estate considering their low usage now in the smart phone age,” said ACI-NA spokesman Scott Elmore, “They are being replaced with electrical charging stations and free Wi-Fi to keep people connected.”

But what about kids or people who don’t have cell phones. Or have cell phones that are out of power?

“Airports are very cognizant of the need to remain accessible,” said Elmore, “So we expect to see the deployment of more courtesy phones with free local and international calling or calling cards for passengers in need.”

At SFO Museum: Fashion in Flight

Braniff International Airways hostess uniform by Emilio Pucci  1966 Boots by Beth Levine SFO Museum -

Braniff International Airways hostess uniform by Emilio Pucci 1966
Boots by Beth Levine
SFO Museum –

Eighty-five years of airline fashion are now on view at San Francisco International Airport, courtesy of the SFO Museum.

Fashion In Flight: A History of Airline Uniform Design includes over 70 complete ensembles and accessories from the likes of Dior, Balenciaga, Yves Saint Laurent, Oleg Cassini, Vivienne Westwood and others and offers insight into the design history and evolution of the airline uniform, its iconic status in popular culture, and its dynamic relationship to the world of fashion.

Here are more samples from the exhibition, which is on view through January 2017 in the International Terminal Main Hall & in the Aviation Museum and Library.

Trans World Airlines hostess uniform by Oleg Cassini  1955 Briny Marlin Coat & Suit Company Hat by Mae Hanauer SFO Museum

Trans World Airlines hostess uniform by Oleg Cassini 1955
Briny Marlin Coat & Suit Company
Hat by Mae Hanauer
SFO Museum

Virgin Atlantic Airways flight attendant uniform by Vivienne Westwood  2014 Courtesy of Virgin Atlantic Airways /SFO Museum

Virgin Atlantic Airways flight attendant uniform by Vivienne Westwood 2014
Courtesy of Virgin Atlantic Airways /SFO Museum

Fashion show on an airport runway? Yes.

Helsinki match made in HEL

A while back, Helsinki Airport and Finnair turned an airport runway into a skatepark.

That worked out so well, they’re doing it again:

On May 24, Finnair and Helsinki Airport (HEL) will host Runway 2 – a fashion show featuring work by top designers from around the world presented on an airport runway.

The event is a Match Made in HEL and will feature the work of yet-to-be announced fashion designers from China, Korea, Japan, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

Sounds like great fun. Especially if the planes landing and taking off that day use the other runway…

Fresh amenities at EWR & LGA

Traveling to or through LaGuardia Airport or Newark Liberty International Airport anytime soon? Look for some of these new dining and shopping outlets.

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Through the end of August, The Food & Shops at LaGuardia Terminal B is having a party to celebrate a year’s worth of improvements that include new specialty stores (America!, Desigual, Duty Free Americas/ L’Occitane, Eddie Bauer, Lacoste, Lick, InMotion Entertainment, Ruby Blue and Tumi) and expanded dining options that now include Bowery Bay Tavern, Piccolo Mercato, Six Blocks Bakery, Sorrentine and Villa Pizza Kitchen.

Be on the lookout for free food tastings, store discounts, live music and special events There’s also a Twitter contest with merchandise giveaways underway.

Over at Newark Liberty International Airport – in United’s Terminal C – OTG has opened some of the first pieces of the “re-imagined” space.

Designed to be “dining oases,” Proof Whiskey Bar and Caps Beer Garden are now in the center of the long hallways. The first of 38 redesigned gate lounges in Terminal C has also opened.

EWR ProofWhiskeyBar_04

EWR ProofWhiskeyBar_02

EWR CAPS BEER GARDEN

EWR GateLounge_02

Fashionable & frivolous flight attendant attire – part 2

Here are more fun photos from a slide show on flight attendant uniforms I put together for CNBC Road Warrior. Part 1 is here.

Hughes Airwest, Designed by Mario Armond Zamparelli, 1972-77

Hughes Airwest uniform courtesy Ted Huetter, Museum of Flight Seattle

According to Seattle’s Museum of Flight, in the early 1970s American artist and designer Mario Armond Zamparelli was asked by business magnate and aviator Howard Hughes to create new flight attendant uniforms for Hughes Airwest. A memorable Airwest outfit was a Sundance Yellow princess-line knit dress, which had a matching zippered jacket. When going outdoors, flight attendants could add a hooded cape or a princess-line coat.

7_Continental1970_shorts


In the 1960s and ’70s, hotpants were common, as seen in this Continental uniform. Courtesy Cliff Muskiet www.uniformfreak.com

“Hot pants and short dresses with hot pants underneath were a common look in the 1960s and ’70s, and Continental, PSA and Southwest Airlines all had uniforms featuring that style,” said Cliff Muskiet of uniformfreakcom. “In those years, the stewardess was used to attract male passengers and hot pants were part of the plan,” he said.

8_courtesy Cathay Pacific

Courtesy Cathay Pacific

Compared with the hot pants-themed uniforms some airlines required their flight attendants to wear during the ’60s and ’70s, these Cathay Pacific uniforms, launched in July 2011, appear to be quite tame. But the union representing the airline’s flight attendants recently complained the outfits were “too sexy.”

In a statement, Cathay Pacific said it has made some modifications to the uniform to address concerns about the length of the blouse and the tightness of the skirt, and crew members “are welcome to exchange their uniform any time if they feel the fit is not right.”

Although many of the older airlines are long gone, some of the classic airlines are looking to return to the skies, such as PEOPLExpress.

In May 2014, a group trying to bring back Eastern Air Lines, the iconic Miami-based carrier that operated from the 1920s until 1991, held a contest to choose a designer for the uniforms crew members might wear when the airline returns to the skies. The winner was Miami-based designer Lisu Vega, whose collection includes a variety of chic, navy and teal outfits with matching hats and luggage.

9_Lisu Vega_Eastern Air Lines possible uniform

Eastern Air Lines uniform Simon Soong / Courtesy Lisu Vega