Harriet Baskas

Drinks on the go – maybe – at St. Louis Int’l Airport

Looks like there will soon be one more airport – St. Louis Lambert International Airport – where passengers my purchase a drink at a bar and take that drink with them to their gate or somewhere else in the airport.

The Missouri House has passed a bill that allows a change in the liquor laws in the state’s airports, allowing people to order alcoholic beverages “to go” from a bar and carry them to their gates in a branded plastic cup, the Associated Press reports,  although travelers would not be able to take those drinks onto planes or through security.

While STL could adopt the rule, Kansas City International Airport probably wouldn’t as most bars at KCI are before security and the law would not allow passengers to take their drinks through security.

There are other airports around the country where “to go” drinks in the terminal are already allowed, including Nashville and Memphis in Tennessee.  Airports in Houston, Portland, OR and Tampa, FL allow this too, says AP.

Good idea?

Beer cans

Movie theater opens at Portland Int’l Airport

It took more than three years to make it happen, but on Thursday the marquee lights at the Hollywood movie theater inside Portland International Airport were switched on and a series of short films by Oregon artists began to play.

The mini-cinema has less than 20 seats but, with standing space, has room for more than 40 people to enjoy the hour-long selection of films that will be shown round-the-clock and refreshed quarterly.

Hooray for Hollywood!

 

 

Fresh art at SFO and Austin-Bergstrom airports

Courtesy Austin-Bergstrom Int’l Airport

Next time you go to the airport, see some art:

At Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, there’s a new exhibit featuring traditional art and artifacts from Mexico and artwork on loan from Austin’s Mexic-Arte Museum.

Some pieces in “Connections & Intersections,” are on loan from the Mexican Consulate General’s office in Austin. Other pieces are from the Mexic-Arte Museum’s Changarrito program, which is a mobile art vending cart that provides Central American visual artists with an opportunity to showcase and sell their work in Austin.  Look for the exhibition through the end of April, post-security between gates 7 to 11.

And, it looks like surf’s up at San Francisco International Airport.

Pipeline, Oahu, Hawaii 1975; Jeff Divine

The SFO Museum is presenting a new exhibition featuring Jeff Devine’s photographs capturing legendary surfers in the 1970s and images of surf culture.

 

Gerry Lopez, Sunset Beach, Oahu, Hawaii 1974; by Jeff Divine – courtesy SFO Museum

Jeff Define: 1970s Surf Photography is on view at SFO Airport in the pre-security area of the Departures Level in Terminal 3 through May 18, 2017.

 

Special livery and new tailfin design for JetBlue

Check out the special livery JetBlue just rolled out on an Embraer 190, one the 100-seat airplanes the carrier uses to serve key cities such as Boston, Washington, D.C. and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

The “Blueprint” paint scheme is designed to showcase the “bones” of the 100-seat aircraft and according to JetBlue draws on the styles of various aviation, nautical and space exploration vehicle cut-away diagrams.

“Mechanical features like the nose gear, jet engine and yoke were among the more obvious design elements to include,” JetBlue said in a statement, “But for the onboard features, JetBlue designers drew upon their own travel experiences, crewmember tales, and the airline’s loyal customers for inspiration, even creating fictional characters to compile a list of the items they might be traveling with. Plane spotters are encouraged to give the overhead bins, under-seat storage areas, and the luggage holds a closer look to see if they can spot the nearly 50 items these “Blueprint” customers are traveling with.”

 

The special – and first – JetBlue E190 special livery debuted at Boston’s Logan International Airport and will operate on routes served by the E190 throughout the JetBlue network.

But wait, there’s more!

As part of its 17th anniversary celebrations, JetBlue also introduced a new tailfin design that will appear on multiple aircraft this year. The design is the airline’s take on the iconic NY skyline.

“The design, which depicts the image of bright lights through window panes of city high-rises, is meant to reflect JetBlue’s growth and New York’s perpetual desire to reach for the sky. Four of JetBlue’s signature colors are reflected in “Highrise” and the illuminated windows can be rearranged creating a slightly different pattern on different aircraft tailfins,” JetBlue said in a statement.

The “Highrise” pattern debuted at JFK airport and will be added to additional aircraft this year.