Who buys luggage at the airport?

women with luggage

I’m all for a very wide array of shops and amenities at airports, but whenever I see luggage for sale in a terminal I’m a bit perplexed.

After all, if you’re going on a trip, wouldn’t you already have a packed suitcase with you?

Bags break, of course, and many people do end up over-doing it a bit on the souvenirs, but I’m on a quest to hear some first-hand stories from people who have purchased a piece of luggage in an airport.

If that’s you, please leave a note in the comment section below. Your story may end up in a future column.

 

5 thoughts on “Who buys luggage at the airport?

  1. Julia says:

    I was traveling to a place where I knew carrying a large purse was not going to cut it, but I needed the large bag as my “personal item” on the plane. As it happened I had time to kill before my flight and visited the airport shop, where I found the perfect small cross-body bag at an unbelievable clearance price. I tucked it into my large bag and I was all set!

  2. David Hewens says:

    I agree completely with you. Seeing a luggage shop at my local airport in Ottawa (YOW) boggled my mind, especially because it’s located in the secure zone beyond the ticket counters and baggage inspectors. Go figure!

  3. I was in Philly and there was a shop with leather luggage. They were offering 50% off and I purchased a briefcase for my husband which he still uses. So for me, there was a need, and the price was right!

    Hmmm…wonder if there is a need for a last minute traveling companion kiosk?

  4. Bill Payne says:

    Open luggage strewn across the lobby floor, with the owners repacking overweight bags into new bags purchased at the airport, is a familiar sight out here in Honolulu. With overweight charges being $200 and more, it can be a good investment to pay $50 for a bag that will accept 50 pounds of belongings and cost $25.00 to check.

    I haven’t done it myself, but I do observe it often both here and when I am traveling. PDX is great for shopping before security, as is RNO.

  5. Chris says:

    I work the ticket counter at an airport, and I had a customer want to check a 60-pound suitcase. When I told her that the overweight charge for any bag over 50 pounds is $100, she elected to visit the gift shop in order to buy an inexpensive carry-on bag for the extra 10 pounds to avoid the charge.

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